Posts tagged exam

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The Importance of Copyrights

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Copyrights. This is the issue. In today’s society, so quickly moving to the metaphysical sphere known as the Internet, we have to hold tight onto our pajamas and push our work out into a void previously unexplored by the eager practitioner of entrepreneurship. In order to survive in a volatile market where fame is greater than skill, there is one single key that protects your work from the thieves of heartless re-distributors, and that is copyrighting.

As much as your car or your house is your property, so should your work be yours (Lessig, Lawrence The Future of Ideas,) and just as a deed to your land or the title of your vehicle grants you that magical power of ownership, so the copyright empowers you to promote your work without the fear of others, less motivated than yourself, to steal, rehash, re-brand, and sell your hard work.

Artists, like myself, find it difficult to make it day-by-day, taking part in wild ventures of creation, such as illustrating a book on elves for free, or volunteering our time to help a random kid from California we just met promote his groundbreaking innovation in coding development. From our deep desire not only to create, but to be well-known, wealthy, and keep creating, artists deeply value copyrights. For as much as we love to create, we love to keep recreating, and in the spirit of this Richard A. Epstein writes “Some creators are motivated solely by the desire to create and would be happy to distribute their works under simple terms …requiring attribution only. But for most authors, compensation matters.” Because without compensation, we simply cannot survive.

And finally, there definitely is a place for free information: work to be shared by merely attribution and with no monetary reimbursement. Just like the book I’m working on illustrating, some projects are there just to help get our name out. But beyond that, artists, and everyone else across the globe, benefit from a moderation of free information and readily-available knowledge, as can be found on Wikipedia, however unreliable it may be. And as Lessig says, “The opportunity for learning is the Internet.” I agree with this, because I have found a great amount of help in online tutorials for learning 3D.

But what it all comes down to is the simple fact that artists cannot survive on their pencil stubs. They need money, and their work needs protection. And that, my friend, is why we have copyrights.

This is an essay I wrote as practice for the College Composition CLEP, but as it stands alone well, I am sharing it as my view on the issue of copyrighting.

Copyright © 2011 Benjamin Bailey

The victor ;)

Literally 6 More

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Yes, I have six more college credits.  This morning my sister and I went to Mountain State University testing center, and we both took the Analyzing and Interpreting Literature CLEP – a college-level exam.  I’m proud to say that I passed with a 78! (Scoring is from 20, being the lowest, to 80, being the highest.)

The victor ;)

I’m hoping to apply to a number of different colleges soon, as well for my passport.  And oh, there’s that package I need to send to the Sunshine state… anyway, please be in prayer for me concerning my life: finding the right college, the right career, et al.

Now time to write a BlenderNation.com post, work a lot on those illustrations for The Book of Sylvari: An Anthology of Elves, and watch more episodes of 24 and perhaps try and old movie like Dial M For Murder.

Peace!

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Humanity (and Six College Credits)

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Hello, all!  Just letting you know that I have passed my first CLEP – that is, College Level Examination Program test.  I took the Humanities exam.  This means I have six (6) credit hours to my name, completely transferable to whichever college I decide upon attending!

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Peeking Over The Results :)

Isn’t this just awesome?  It took me a few months of preparation to be ready for the test, most of which wasn’t really studying.  Alright, since I’ve confused you, let me give you the whole low-down on what I did:

  • First, my sister decided that she wanted to take the Humanities test next, since it was on her list of CLEPs she needed to take.  And since I didn’t end up taking Natural Sciences with her, I decided to have a go at this CLEP, too.  Thankfully, I ended up taking the exam this time.
  • Next, she bought a study guide, the official CLEP review book on Humanities. Man, was that book helpful.  It provided us with two practice examination tests.
  • Then we crammed.  We were expecting to take it back in April, but we didn’t feel prepared. So we waited.
  • Then it rolled around to last week, and my sister wanted to take the test.  Fair enough, but when it came time for it, I still wasn’t ready.  So we delayed till this week.  She took it on Wednesday, but once again, I did not feel ready.
  • So, I took it today. And passed!

One final thing you should know: right before a test, I would cram, cram, cram, using Wikipedia primarily.  I searched up so many different authors, poets, playwrights, operas, movements – wow.  I can definitely say I learned a lot.  Thing is, I probably won’t remember a bit of it in a few months.  But at least I can say I can cram.

After all, that’s all colleges want us to do, right?  Get an A?

>Sigh<  Well, I really did learn a lot from this preparing for this test.  I’m glad for the learning, the college credit, and the personal macho-feeling it gives you.  Even if the educational system is off-kilter, one can still choose to learn.  Life is a journey, and no matter what, new adventures and places to discover will appear on the horizon.

Let us learn together!

P.S. And oh, BTW!  I got a great score on the test: 72!  You see, 20 points is the lowest you can get, and 80 points is the very highest, whereas 50 points is passing.  So I did well, and I’m thankful.   A great, big thanks to all my friends who thought of me, encouraged me, and prayed for me.  Praise God!

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